How to Apply / Current Opportunities / RFP Frequently Asked Questions

Frequently Asked Questions

Follow this link to the question submission form at the bottom of this page.  Please keep an eye on this page for new questions and replies.

Application Deadline: Friday, March 9, 2018, 11:59 PM Pacific Time.

Click on a category below to open and close the list of questions. Click on the link for this page in the menu at left to clear filters from using searches or tags.

Application Guidelines

Yes! Please write if you wish to have feedback on a past proposal to JRS.  Be sure that the request comes from the original project director or team as we do not share information about proposals with out the permission of the primary grant application.

Yes!  We clarified the Requirements to read: “The grant applicants are (1) African or (2) that African principals and African institutions play major and long-term roles in project implementation and sustainability, and as recipients of funds.” If, for example, the lead institution is from the Americas or Europe, we will closely examine the plans and flows of funds to look for significant African roles.  We may also look that if technical expertise resides out of Africa, that capacity development and knowledge transfer is a key component and outcome.

We have no preference, design projects for success. Like any donor, we want the most impact for our dollar. An excellent site-specific project that yields transferable technology, skills, success and lessons may have greater impact over the long-term than regional scale projects.  Any regional project proposal would need to cite how it compares to any other regional biodiversity informatics projects that have (or have not) resulted in a strong residual national or local capacity. JRS might be at our best when we invest in capacity at the individual or network level.  We don’t have the staff, resources and on-the-ground presence to add significant value to regional efforts.  Our advice is always that you should, propose what will be most successful since you are the experts in your domains and your countries.  We have no principle of equitable funding across countries – just the pursuit of results.

No, we don’t grant to individuals. JRS only makes grants to organizations. Please see the first section on our Grantmaking page for ‘The Basics’ of what we support and do not support. We do examine whether the project director and key project staff are employees of the applying organization and whether they have stable salary support for the duration of the project. We aim to invest in long-term capacity in biodiversity informatics in sub-Saharan Africa at both the level of individual training and organizational development. Individuals may find training opportunities through JRS grantees and announcements on our website and we often fund Ph.D. and Master’s programs within our grant projects. [Q: 13 Jan 2017 – A: 13 Jan 2017]

General Scope

Yes, we welcome projects for capacity development in biodiversity informatics in 2018.  These projects would not be as strictly geographically limited as our other projects. However, we look for capacity development aimed at the root competencies for creating, managing, and promoting biodiversity information systems, such as the subjects you might see in the Biodiversity Informatics Training Curriculum.  Our strategy is “demand-driven” and we would look for strong roles of African institutions and evidence that the capacity serves local needs.

We have no preference, design projects for success. Like any donor, we want the most impact for our dollar. An excellent site-specific project that yields transferable technology, skills, success and lessons may have greater impact over the long-term than regional scale projects.  Any regional project proposal would need to cite how it compares to any other regional biodiversity informatics projects that have (or have not) resulted in a strong residual national or local capacity. JRS might be at our best when we invest in capacity at the individual or network level.  We don’t have the staff, resources and on-the-ground presence to add significant value to regional efforts.  Our advice is always that you should, propose what will be most successful since you are the experts in your domains and your countries.  We have no principle of equitable funding across countries – just the pursuit of results.

Freshwater Scope

Yes.  Estuaries are in scope but they might be less in the bulls-eye of the target than a pure freshwater system project. Our choice of freshwater systems is to find intersections of conservation and human needs where there is a high demand for biodiversity information systems.  That demand for information, in turn, sustains the capacity for biodiversity information systems that is our goal. A project focused on estuaries would need to demonstrate partnership between data users and data providers and development of capacity.  A focus on species or technical platforms or partners that are applicable to purely freshwater ecosystems would make the project of greater interest than one with a focus on the marine end of the estuary. [Q: 23 Jan, A: 23 Jan]

Pollinators Scope

Absolutely. The RFP is not limited to Lepidotpera and applicants can make the case for any pollinators species. We mention butterflies and bees for their ‘charismatic’ nature or well-understood connection to agriculture.  Yes, we would include Sphingidae (hawk moths), Noctuidae (owlet moths), Erebidae (erebid moths), Geometridae (geometer moths), Tortricidae (leafroller moths), Pyralidae (snout/grass moths), Hesperiidae (skippers) and Papilionoidea (common butterflies). Please note our current grants in Pollinators that could relate to this work.

No.  We are sorry that we do not support direct development activities such as bee-keeping, tree-planting, agricultural training, women’s livelihood development, participatory environmental planning, education and other direct development interventions.  We recognize that grass-roots participation, community stewardship of biodiversity, and sustainable livelihoods are key to conservation.  Our narrow focus is financial support for the information technologies that support conservation such as data collection, database development, mobile applications, websites, and related capacity development activities.

Geographic Scope

Please see the Where We Work page on JRS’ website.   We are funding technical projects this year in East Africa in Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda and in Southern Africa in Botswana, Malawi, and South Africa.  We will make rare exceptions for exceptional projects in other countries and we encourage applicants from other countries to send a short project description for review.  We will fund biodiversity informatics Capacity Development projects in other countries, particularly if they welcome participants from outside of the host country.

!New this week!

Yes! Please write if you wish to have feedback on a past proposal to JRS.  Be sure that the request comes from the original project director or team as we do not share information about proposals with out the permission of the primary grant application.

Yes!  We clarified the Requirements to read: “The grant applicants are (1) African or (2) that African principals and African institutions play major and long-term roles in project implementation and sustainability, and as recipients of funds.” If, for example, the lead institution is from the Americas or Europe, we will closely examine the plans and flows of funds to look for significant African roles.  We may also look that if technical expertise resides out of Africa, that capacity development and knowledge transfer is a key component and outcome.

Absolutely. The RFP is not limited to Lepidotpera and applicants can make the case for any pollinators species. We mention butterflies and bees for their ‘charismatic’ nature or well-understood connection to agriculture.  Yes, we would include Sphingidae (hawk moths), Noctuidae (owlet moths), Erebidae (erebid moths), Geometridae (geometer moths), Tortricidae (leafroller moths), Pyralidae (snout/grass moths), Hesperiidae (skippers) and Papilionoidea (common butterflies). Please note our current grants in Pollinators that could relate to this work.

Yes, we welcome projects for capacity development in biodiversity informatics in 2018.  These projects would not be as strictly geographically limited as our other projects. However, we look for capacity development aimed at the root competencies for creating, managing, and promoting biodiversity information systems, such as the subjects you might see in the Biodiversity Informatics Training Curriculum.  Our strategy is “demand-driven” and we would look for strong roles of African institutions and evidence that the capacity serves local needs.

We have no preference, design projects for success. Like any donor, we want the most impact for our dollar. An excellent site-specific project that yields transferable technology, skills, success and lessons may have greater impact over the long-term than regional scale projects.  Any regional project proposal would need to cite how it compares to any other regional biodiversity informatics projects that have (or have not) resulted in a strong residual national or local capacity. JRS might be at our best when we invest in capacity at the individual or network level.  We don’t have the staff, resources and on-the-ground presence to add significant value to regional efforts.  Our advice is always that you should, propose what will be most successful since you are the experts in your domains and your countries.  We have no principle of equitable funding across countries – just the pursuit of results.

Please see the Where We Work page on JRS’ website.   We are funding technical projects this year in East Africa in Kenya, Rwanda, Tanzania, and Uganda and in Southern Africa in Botswana, Malawi, and South Africa.  We will make rare exceptions for exceptional projects in other countries and we encourage applicants from other countries to send a short project description for review.  We will fund biodiversity informatics Capacity Development projects in other countries, particularly if they welcome participants from outside of the host country.

Planning Grants

A planning grant may be  your best approach if there are critical gaps in areas that the JRS Biodiversity Foundation has identified as critically important. For example, you may need a planning grant if (1) you do not know who your partners will be, (2) you do not have a partnership with the end-users of the data or knowledge tool, (3) you do not yet know what hardware and software technology you might employ, or (4) this is your first project in pollinator or freshwater biodiversity.  Even in a technical implementation project, you may schedule for a “ramp up” period for planning and formal partnership agreements. [Q: Jan 25, A: Jan 25]

Category: Planning Grants

RFP Question Form

Please enter your question below. You will receive email confirmation and a direct reply. Anonymous answers will be added to the FAQ above within 48 hours.

Subscribe to our mailing list

* indicates required
Which are your primary communications interest?